Sunscreen Quiz

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We don’t all tan or react to sunscreen the same. That’s because there are different skin types ranging from Type I, very fair, to Type VI, very dark, that determine how we react to sun exposure and damage.

The Fitzpatrick Skin Type classification system serves as a guide to help you figure out your skin type. This classification system was first developed in 1975 by Thomas Fitzpatrick, MD, of Harvard Medical School. We designed a quiz to measure the two major skin components: genetic disposition and reaction to sun. However, it’s important to have in mind that the Fitzpatrick Skin Type does not substitute professional medical advice. 

Quiz yourself! Grab a piece of paper and a calculator

Part I of the quiz is based on the genetic disposition of your skin.

Your eye color is:

Light blue, light gray or light green=0

Blue, gray or green= 1

Hazel or light brown= 3

Dark brown= 3

Brownish black= 4

Your natural hair color is:

Red or light blonde = 0

Blonde= 1

Dark blonde or light brown= 2

Black= 4

Your natural skin color is:

Ivory white= 0

Fair or pale= 1Fair to beige, with golden undertone= 2

Olive or light brown= 3

Dark brown or black= 4

How many freckles do you have on unexposed areas of your skin?

Many= 0

Several= 1

A few= 2

Very few= 3

None= 4

Now add up your total score for genetic disposition: ____

Part II focuses on your skin’s reaction to extended sun exposure

How does your skin respond to the sun?

Always burns, blisters and peels= 0

Often burns, blisters, and peels= 1

Burns moderately= 2

Burns rarely, if at all= 3

Never burns= 4

Does your skin tan?

Never. It just burns= 0

Seldom= 1

Often= 3

Always= 4

How deeply do you tan?

Not at all or very little= 0

Lightly= 1

Moderately= 2

Deeply= 3

My skin is naturally dark= 4

How sensitive is your face to the sun?

Very sensitive= 0

Sensitive= 1

Normal= 2

Resistant= 3

Very resistant/Never had a problem= 4

Now add up your score for reaction to sun exposure!

 

Finally, add both scores to determine your Fitzpatrick Skin Type:

Type I: (0-6 pts.)

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If you have Type I skin it means that no matter how much tanning lotion you put on, you burn instead of tanning. You should be extremely careful when exposed to the sun since you are very susceptible to skin damage and skin cancers like basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. In addition, the chances of you developing melanoma are very high. Four your skin type it is highly recommended to use a sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. Try to remain in the shade when outdoors to avoid sun exposure as much as possible. It is very important to constantly check your skin head-to-toe for any suspicious growths and have an annual professional skin checkup.

 Type II: (7-12 pts.)  

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You usually burn. You should be careful when exposed to the sun since you are very susceptible to skin damage and skin cancers like basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. In addition, the chances of you developing melanoma are very high. Four your skin type it is highly recommended to use a sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. Try to remain in the shade when outdoors to avoid sun exposure as much as possible. It is very important to constantly check your skin head-to-toe for any suspicious growths and have an annual professional skin checkup.  

 Type III (13-18 pts.)

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On your bad days you tend to burn, but on your good days you find yourself with a tan after a day at the beach/pool. . You should be careful when exposed to the sun since you are very susceptible to skin damage and skin cancers like basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma. It is highly recommended to use a sunscreen with a SPF of at least 15, wear sun-protective clothing, and seek the shade between 10a.m. and 4p.m. It is very important to constantly check your skin head-to-toe for any suspicious growths and have an annual professional skin checkup.

 Type IV: (19-24 pts.) 

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Lucky for you, you tend to tan easily and rarely burn. Nevertheless, you should always take preventive measures since you are still susceptible to skin damage and at risk of developing skin cancers. Use sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher and seek the shade between 10a.m. and 4p.m. whenever possible. It is very important to constantly check your skin head-to-toe for any suspicious growths and have an annual professional skin checkup.

 Type V: (25-30 pts.)

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Lucky for you, you tend to tan easily and rarely burn. Nevertheless, you should always take preventive measures since you are still susceptible to skin damage and at risk of developing skin cancers such as acral lentiginous melanoma, which is very common among darker-skinned people. This form of cancer usually appears on parts of the body that are not often exposed to the sun, which is why it usually remains undetected until after the cancer has spread. Use sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher and seek the shade between 10a.m. and 4p.m. whenever possible. It is very important to constantly check your skin head-to-toe (especially on the palms, soles of the feet and mucous membranes) for any suspicious growths and have an annual professional skin checkup.

 Type VI: (31+ pts.)

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You do not burn. However, you are still at risk for skin cancers such as acral lentigious melanoma, which is very common among dark-skinned people. This cancer teds to appear in parts of the body that are not usually exposed to the sun and often remain undetected until the cancer has spread. As preventive measures, you should always use a sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher and seek the shade between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. You should also frequently check your skin head-to-toe for any suspicious growths, especially on the palms, soles of the feet and mucous membranes.  

Now that you learned more about your skin type you know how to properly take care of it. Stay safe and healthy with Hampton Sun!